Jan 082015
 

Sponsor Soda!

Just Click on the PayPal button here and donate any amount monthly you would like.  in the comment section just type “Soda” and your donation will go to give Sage the life she deserves.  You can choose not to make a choice of a particular senior and your funds will go to the general CSBR Senior Fund to help any senior that needs support.

 

About Perma Foster Soda

2SODA ALREADY HAS HIS PERMA-FOSTER FAMILY BUT WE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR NEW PERMA-FOSTER FAMILIES FOR DOGS THAT ARE COMING INTO RESCUE.

If you are interested in caring for an older dog, please fill out a foster application at www.gotdrool.org

Permanent Foster Program
Some of our foster dogs are never chosen for adoption. They could be seniors or have a medical problem that is too costly for an adopter to take on. CSBR offers these dogs for permanent fostering for the rest of their lives. It’s a win-win program. The Saint Bernard has a permanent home that matches his or her needs and the permanent foster family is relieved of the veterinary expense of keeping the dog.

 

 Posted by at 12:17 am
Apr 112012
 

Dogs and Chocolate: Get the Facts

Most of us have heard that chocolate can make dogs sick. But how serious is the risk?

By Salynn Boyles
WebMD Pet Health Feature

If your canine companion is more family member than pet, you may be in the habit of sharing the foods your family loves with him.

Although some people foods are fine in moderation, this is definitely not the case with chocolate.

Chocolate can sicken and even kill dogs, and it is one of the most common causes of canine poisoning, veterinarians tell WebMD.

Veterinarian Michelle DeHaven says the worst case of chocolate poisoning she ever saw happened when some owners fed their eight-pound poodle a pound of chocolate on his birthday.

“We had to treat the dog with fluids and anti-seizure medication for five days,” says DeHaven, who practices inSmyrna,Ga.”Every time we stopped the meds he would start seizuring again. You wouldn’t feed a kid a pound of chocolate, but they fed it to a small dog.”

No amount of chocolate is OK for your dog to consume. Dark chocolate and baker’s chocolate are riskiest; milk and white chocolate pose a much less serious risk.

What Makes Chocolate Poisonous to Dogs?

Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain caffeine and a related chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger.

The problem is that dogs metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans,Denverveterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, tells WebMD.

“The buzz we get from eating chocolate may last 20 to 40 minutes, but for dogs it lasts many hours,” he says. “After 17 hours, half of the theobromine a dog has ingested is still in the system.”

Theobromine is also toxic to cats, but there are very few reported cases of theobromine poisoning in felines because they rarely eat chocolate.

Dogs, on the other hand, will eat just about anything.

Even small amounts of chocolate can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Truly toxic amounts can induce hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.

Dogs and Chocolate: How Much is Too Much?

The more theobromine a cocoa product contains, the more poisonous it is to your dog.

Unsweetened bakers chocolate contains about 390 milligrams of theobromine per ounce — about 10 times more than milk chocolate and more than twice as much as semi-sweet chocolate. White chocolate contains very little theobromine.

According to the Merck Veterinary Manual, one ounce of milk chocolate per pound of body weight is potentially lethal.

But the real danger lies with dark chocolate. Merck warns that deaths have been reported with theobromine doses as low as 115 milligrams per kilogram (2.2 pounds) of body weight.

So 20 ounces of milk chocolate, 10 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate, and just 2.25 ounces of baking chocolate could potentially kill a 22-pound dog, Fitzgerald says.

Serious toxic reactions can occur with ingestion of about 100 to 150 milligrams of theobromine per kilogram of body weight.

That means:

  • A 9-pound dog could be expected to show symptoms of chocolate toxicity after eating 1 ounce of baking chocolate, 3 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate, or 9 ounces of milk chocolate.
  • A 27-pound dog might have such symptoms after eating 3 ounces of baking chocolate, 9 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate, and 27 ounces of milk chocolate.
  • A 63-pound dog might exhibit symptoms after eating 7 ounces of baking chocolate, 21 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate, or 63 ounces of milk chocolate.

“In 27 years of practice, I’ve seen two dogs die from eating chocolate,”says Fitzgerald, who appears regularly on Animal Planet’s hit show Emergency Vets. “Both were under 20 pounds, both were elderly and both ate baking chocolate in very large amounts.”

Although most people would not eat a 4-ounce bar of bitter-tasting baking chocolate, this is not true of dogs, he says.

“Dogs experience the world through tasting it, and they are gorgers,” he says. “Baking chocolate tastes good to them.”

Your Dog Ate Chocolate: Now What?

DeHaven, who owns Cumberland Animal Clinic inSmyrna, says she typically gets two to three calls a month from owners whose dogs have eaten chocolate.

When an owner calls, she asks how much and what kind of chocolate the dog has eaten and the dog’s weight.

“If a 60-pound golden retriever eats a bag of Hershey’s kisses, there isn’t too much to worry about,” she says. “The dog will probably have a stomachache, but not much else.”

After eating a potentially toxic dose of chocolate, dogs typically develop diarrhea and start vomiting.

If the dog isn’t vomiting on its own, the vet may advise inducing vomiting immediately to keep as much theobromine as possible from entering the system.

One method is giving the dog a one-to-one solution of hydrogen peroxide and water. But DeHaven says that treatment is now discouraged because it can cause esophageal ulcers.

She recommends syrup of ipecac, which induces vomiting.

When a dog shows signs of hyperactivity and agitation or is having seizures, the faster you get it to the vet the better. But there is no specific antidote for chocolate poisoning.

Fluids are typically given along with intravenous drugs to limit seizures and protect the heart.

Symptoms of theobromine poisoning generally occur within four to 24 hours after chocolate is consumed.

Cocoa Shell Mulch: A Little-Known Danger

Most people don’t realize it, but those increasingly popular cocoa shell mulches used for landscaping can also pose a serious risk to dogs in the same way that chocolate does.

Terry and Dawn Hall found out the hard way several years ago when their beloved 105-pound chocolate lab ‘Moose’ died after eating just eight ounces of cocoa shell mulch used to landscape theirMinneapolisyard.

The death prompted the couple to contactMinnesotastate senator Scott Dibble, who sponsored a bill to require cocoa mulch sellers to warn customers of the potential danger to dogs. His bill was approved by the Legislature, but vetoed by the governor.

“It is my understanding that theobromine can be removed from cocoa mulch pretty easily, and that some manufacturers do this and others do not,” Dibble tells WebMD. “But right now there is no way for the consumer to know if the mulch they are buying has been treated.”

 

Apr 112012
 

13 Tips for Dog Friendly Hiking

Here are our dog friendly hiking tips that we want to pass on.

1 – Make sure your dog is in good physical condition

Begin with long walks in your neighborhood before you start short hikes in the woods. Work up from there. Believe it or not, Ty matches Buster’s pace – but only because we built up his endurance.

2 – Check the dog regulations in the area you’ll be hiking

Know whether dogs are allowed and if they must be leashed. We’ve even seen some rules specify the length of the leash. Depending on the terrain and/or the number of cars parked at the trail head, we may use shorter or longer leads on Ty and Buster. We rarely allow our dogs to hike off leash.

3 – Prepare your dog for the weather and terrain

Spring and summer hiking means sun and bugs. Bring sun screen and insect repellant formulated for dogs. Breeds with thin coats may require an outer layer if you’re hiking in wet or cold conditions. Doggie booties may be necessary if you’ll be hiking over rocks or terrain with cacti or nettles. In snowy conditions, booties can prevent ice from forming between the toes … not the Frosty Paw your dog was looking for!

4 – Carry plenty of water for your dog

We (should) all know that dogs don’t sweat. That makes them prone to heat stroke in warmer temps. I used to be a competitive runner, and the rule was: Drink before you get thirsty. The same applies to your dog. And I would strongly discourage you from allowing your dog to drink from streams or lake shores as the water may contain gnarly parasites.

5 – Leaves of 3, let it be

Dogs are susceptible to plant-based toxins just as people are. If you can’t recognize poison ivy (or oak or sumac), you are not ready for hiking.

6 – They call it wildlife for a reason

Your dog can hear, smell, and sense things before you can. If your dog starts barking, he may be warning you of a bear, coyote, or snake in the vicinity. We just finished a hike where bear spray and dog bells would have been smart to carry. Keep your dog in sight and be alert!

7 – Carry a small first aid kit

Notice I didn’t say a pet first aid kit. Generally, a human first aid kit will do since you are both likely to suffer the same type of cuts, bruises, and abrasions. Oh, and know what’s in your kit and how to use it. When someone is howling in pain, then is not the time to search the kit or read the directions.

8 – Your dog should have proper identification

In case your dog runs off or gets lost, make sure his ID tag is properly secured to a collar that won’t slip off. The tag should have your cell phone number and any other information that someone might need if they find your dog. Here’s what we put on Ty and Buster’s tags.

9 – Watch out if it’s hunting season

Take extra precaution when hiking during any hunting season. Bright or reflective dog clothing will help her stand out in the natural environment. You might want to wear something similar as well!

10 – Your dog can share the load

Let your dog get used to carrying a pack by starting with short walks. Most dogs can safely carry up to a third of their weight. Do not overload! Adjust the pack contents and straps as needed to balance the weight. Buster wears a pack from Ruff Wear to haul the boys’ water and a light collapsible bowl.

11 – Someone should know you and your dog went for a hike

S**t happens! Let a relative, friend, neighbor, or park ranger know where you’re going and when you expect to be back. A small, printed note card with this information and relevant contact numbers could save a lot of heartache.

12 – No one should know you and your dog went hiking

All trash and poop should be bagged, carried out, and properly disposed of. Don’t leave any evidence that you and your dog were on the trail.

13 – When you get home, check for ticks

Ticks can cause sever medical problems such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever – both of which can be contracted by humans. Talk to your vet about an appropriate tick prevention program and be sure to examine your dog, especially after hiking in wooded areas where ticks are common. You may want to consider a product like Pet Armour before you go on your hike.

 

 

Apr 112012
 

Dogs Pulling on Leash

Don’t let your dog pull you around. Essential leash training tips to keep your dog from pulling.

By September Morn

Posted: March 5, 2012, 9 a.m. EST

Why dogs do this

A dog pulls on the leash for several reasons:

• Sees, hears, or smells something exciting.
• Excess energy makes it hard for her to contain herself.
• Through experience, realizes that pulling on leash makes the handler walk faster or go the direction she wants.
• Because she can.

Why this dog behavior is a problem

Pulling on leash can start off innocently, but can become a problem for both the dog and the handler. The added pressure of the collar against the dog’s windpipe (trachea) can cause wheezing or coughing, which may be only temporary, or may cause long-term or even permanent damage to the dog. A dog who pulls strongly can cause the handler to lose balance and slip or fall. Strong leash pulling by a large dog, especially near roads with traffic, can lead to serious accidents.

Dog leash training tools

Changing from a neck collar to either a head halter or front-attachment body harness can bring an immediate solution to leash pulling. These tools provide a mechanical advantage for the handler and do not cause pain for the dog. Using a head halter or front-attachment harness immediately allows the handler to control the direction and speed of the dog, without needing a lot of physical strength to accomplish this, but the dog still needs to learn how to walk politely, without pulling at all.

Teaching your dog to walk on a leash

A good way to teach loose-leash walking to a dog who pulls on the leash is to show her that pulling no longer “works” they way she thinks it will. When your dog starts to pull, simply stop walking. Stand still and wait for your dog to realize she’s not getting anywhere.

If your dog continues to pull after you’ve been stopped for three seconds, start very slowly walking backwards. Your dog will realize she’s losing ground now, not gaining it. When the dog turns around to look at you, wondering what’s gone wrong at your end of the leash, the leash will loosen a little bit. At that point, you can praise her and start walking forward again.

By consistently repeating this process each time she pulls, she will start to realize that pulling activates your “brakes” and not your “accelerator,” and the frequency of pulling will gradually diminish and eventually disappear.

Once your dog understands how to walk without pulling when wearing a head collar or body harness, you’ll be able to re-introduce her to walking politely while wearing an ordinary collar.

Apr 052012
 

What is bloat?

Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) is also known as “bloat,” “stomach torsion,” or “twisted stomach.” Bloat is an extremely serious condition, and should be considered a life-threatening emergency when it occurs. There are no home remedies for bloat, therefore dog owners must contact their veterinarians immediately if they suspect that their dog has bloat. Dogs can die of bloat within several hours. Even with treatment, as many as 25-33% of dogs with GDV die.

The gastric dilatation is one part of the condition and the volvulus or torsion is the second part. In bloat (dilatation), due to a number of different and sometimes unknown reasons, the stomach fills up with air and puts pressure on the other organs and diaphragm. The pressure on the diaphragm makes it difficult for the dog to breathe. The air-filled stomach also compresses large veins in the abdomen, thus preventing blood from returning to the heart. Filled with air, the stomach can easily rotate on itself, thus pinching off its blood supply. Once this rotation (volvulus) occurs and the blood supply is cut off, the stomach begins to die and the entire blood supply is disrupted and the animal’s condition begins to deteriorate very rapidly.

Not all dogs that have a gas buildup and resultant dilatation develop the more serious and life threatening volvulus. However, almost all dogs that have a volvulus develop it as a result of a dilatation.

Bloat is a very serious and life threatening condition. Understanding the signs, prevention, and need for prompt treatment will help reduce the risk of mortality if your dog develops this problem.

What dogs are more susceptible?

Breed

There is a definite link between the likelihood of occurrence of GDV and the breed and build of the dog. GDV is much more likely to occur in large breeds with deep, narrow chests. The problem can occur in small dogs, but only rarely. TheUniversityofPurdueconducted a study of hundreds of dogs that had developed GDV, and they calculated a ratio of likelihood of a particular breed developing the problem as compared to a mixed breed dog. For example, using the GDV risk ratio, a Great Dane is 41.4 times more likely to develop GDV than a mixed breed dog.

Breed

GDV Risk Ratio

Risk Rank

Great Dane

41.4

1

Saint Bernard

21.8

2

Weimaraner

19.3

3

Irish Setter

14.2

4

Gordon Setter

12.3

5

Standard   Poodle

8.8

6

Basset Hound

5.9

7

Doberman   Pinscher

5.5

8

Old English   Sheepdog

4.8

9

German   Shorthaired Pointer

4.6

10

Newfoundland

4.4

11

German   Shepherd

4.2

12

Airedale   Terrier

4.1

13

Alaskan   Malamute

4.1

14

Chesapeake   Bay Retriever

3.7

15

Boxer

3.7

16

Collie

2.8

17

Labrador   Retriever

2

18

English   Springer Spaniel

2

19

Samoyed

1.6

20

Dachshund

1.6

21

Golden   Retriever

1.2

22

Rottweiler

1.1

23

Mixed

1.0

24

Miniature   Poodle

0.3

25

Genetics

In addition to breed predilection, there appears to be a genetic link to this disease. The incidence is closely correlated to the depth and width of the dog’s chest. Several different genes from the parents determine these traits. If both parents have particularly deep and narrow chests, then it is highly likely that their offspring will have deep and narrow chests and the resulting problems that may go with it. This is why in particular breeds we see a higher incidence in certain lines, most likely because of that line’s particular chest conformation.

Age

Dogs over 7 years of age are more than twice as likely to develop gastric dilatation and volvulus as those who are 2-4 years of age.

Gender

Male dogs are twice as likely to develop gastric dilatation and volvulus as females. Neutering does not appear to have an effect on the risk of bloat.

Eating habits

Dogs fed once a day are twice as likely to develop GDV as those fed twice a day. It appears that dogs who eat rapidly or exercise soon after a meal may also be at increased risk.

Temperament

Dogs that tend to be more nervous, anxious, or fearful appear to be at an increased risk of developing bloat.

What causes gastric dilatation and volvulus?

There is no one particular activity that leads to the development of GDV. It appears that it occurs as a combination of events. Studies of the stomach gas that occurs in dilatation have shown that it is similar to the composition of normal room air suggesting that the dilatation occurs as a result of swallowing air. All dogs, and people for that matter, swallow air, but normally we eructate (burp) and release this air and it is not a problem. For some reason that scientists have not yet determined, these dogs that develop bloat do not release this swallowed gas. There are currently several studies looking into what happens physiologically in these dogs that develop GDV.

******What are the signs?

The most obvious signs are abdominal distention (swollen belly) and nonproductive vomiting (animal appears to be vomiting, but nothing comes up) and retching. Other signs include restlessness, abdominal pain, and rapid shallow breathing. Profuse salivation may indicate severe pain. If the dog’s condition continues to deteriorate, especially if volvulus has occurred, the dog may go into shock and become pale, have a weak pulse, a rapid heart rate, and eventually collapse. A dog with gastric dilatation without volvulus can show all of these signs, but the more severe signs are likely to occur in dogs with both dilatation and volvulus.

How is gastric dilatation and volvulus treated?

Even with treatment,   as many as 25-30% of dogs with GDV die.

When the dog is presented to the hospital his condition is assessed. Blood samples are generally taken and tested to help determine the dog’s status. Usually the animal is in shock, or predisposed to it, so intravenous catheters are placed and fluids are administered. Antibiotics and pain relievers may be given.

The air in the stomach is removed either by passing a stomach tube or inserting a large needle into the stomach and releasing the gas. After the animal is stabilized, x-rays are taken to help determine whether or not a volvulus is present.

Some dogs with GDV develop a bleeding disorder called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), in which small clots start to develop within the dog’s blood vessels. To prevent or treat this condition, heparin, an anticoagulant, may be given.

The heart rate and rhythm are closely monitored. Some dogs with GDV develop heart arrhythmias, and this is a common cause of death in dogs with GDV. Dogs that already have a heart disease or are prone to heart arrythmias are generally treated with appropriate medications.

Once the dog is stabilized, abdominal surgery is usually indicated to accomplish three things:

  • Assess the health of the stomach and surrounding organs. If areas of the stomach or spleen have been irreversibly damaged, they are removed. In such a case, the chances for recovery are very poor, and euthanasia may be an alternative.
  • Properly reposition the stomach
  • Suture the stomach in a way to prevent it from twisting again (a procedure called gastropexy). If gastropexy is not performed, 75-80% of dogs will develop GDV again.

After surgery, the dog is closely monitored for several days for signs of infection, heart abnormalities, DIC, stomach ulceration or perforation, and damage to the pancreas or liver. Antibiotics and additional medications may need to be given.

How is gastric dilatation and volvulus prevented?

Despite adopting all of the recommendations listed below, a dog may still develop GDV. Because of the genetic link involved with this disease, prospective pet owners should question if there is a history of GDV in the lineage of any puppy that is from a breed listed as high risk. In addition, the following recommendations should be followed:

  • Owners of susceptible breeds should be aware of the early signs of bloat and contact their veteriarian as soon as possible if GDV is suspected.
  • Owners of susceptible breeds should develop a good working relationship with a local veterinarian in case emergency care is needed.
  • Large dogs should be fed two or three times daily, rather than once a day.
  • Water should be available at all times, but should be limited immediately after feeding.
  • Vigorous exercise, excitement, and stress should be avoided one hour before and two hours after meals.
  • Diet changes should be made gradually over a period of three to five days.
  • Susceptible dogs should be fed individually and, if possible in a quiet location.
  • Some studies suggest that dogs who are susceptible to bloat should not be fed with elevated feeders; other studies have not found this to be true. It is recommended, however, that dogs at increased risk be fed at floor level.
  • Some studies have associated food particle size, fat content, moistening of foods containing citric acid, and other factors with bloat. At this time, no cause-and-result relationships between these factors and bloat have been verified.
  • Dogs that have survived bloat are at an increased risk for future episodes; therefore prevention in the form of preventive surgery or medical management should be discussed with the veterinarian.

Summary

Bloat is a life threatening condition that most commonly affects large-breed, deep-chested dogs over two years of age. Owners of susceptible breeds should be knowledgeable about the signs of the disease, since early and prompt treatment can greatly improve the outcome. By following the preventive measures recommended, pet owners can further reduce the likelihood of their pet developing this devastating condition.

Mar 092012
 
  1. Puppy Mills and Animal Shelters

    Each year, millions of dogs are killed in animal shelters, while at the same time, “puppy mills” breed thousands of puppies a year for sale to pet shops across the country.

    In a world of “pregnancy for profit” these dogs are forced to live their entire, sometimes very short lives, in dark warehouses . . . in tiny, crowded, and indescribably filthy conditions. Females are bred continuously until they die. Between pregnancies, hundreds of dogs compete for attention and food – their bony bodies a testament to inadequate food and water, substandard housing, insufficient exercise and infrequent, if any, veterinary care Puppies are taken away from their mothers as young as four weeks of age, packed several to a crate, with little food, water, or ventilation and transported to pet stores across the country.

    Their soft and fuzzy faces tug at our heartstrings, compelling us to stop and buy that one lonely puppy. But beyond that innocent face in the window lies a callous industry fraught with deception and cruelty. Many times the puppies arrive at the pet stores malnourished or ill; some never make it at all. The people who buy these puppies think they are taking home a healthy, well adjusted companion animal. But sadly, many times they discover they have purchased a dog that has a personality problem, disease, or genetic defect – caused by over breeding, inbreeding, or the unsanitary, squalid conditions at the puppy mill.

    I suggest that people looking for companion animals adopt them from their local humane society, shelter, or breed rescue club. Only when people make a vow to adopt companion animals, instead of buying them, will we be able to see a reduction in the millions of companion animals tragically killed in our nation’s shelters.

    Ellen Gregory egregory@ArkansasUSA.com

     

    LEARN ABOUT PUPPY MILLS

    This page is dedicated to Lucy!

  2. Lucy died at 5 months old. She was a puppy mill dog. She died from Distemper.

Jan 092012
 
I’m familiar with hundreds of dog breeds, but what’s an “outside dog?” Unless you’re medically intolerant of it (and therefore can’t take care of it in a medical emergency, so you shouldn’t have it), making a dog stay outside is a costly waste. If it’s for protection, what do you think I want to steal, your lawn? When you leave, do you put your valuables and your kids out in your yard? Just what is the dog “protecting” out there? Most dogs kept out cause far more nuisance complaints from barking and escaping than any deterrent to intrusion. Such complaints cause teasing, antagonism, release and poisoning. I lost count of the number of times I’ve heard: “NOW I know why I find so many rocks, sticks and cans in my yard! They’re throwing them at my dog!” Or: “So that’s why I’ve had to replace the padlock on the fence 17 times in the past year!” With your dog a helpless victim, it’s no laughing matter.

If I’m a crook and your dog is out, your fence protects ME, not your possessions or dog. If I just open the gate 9 out of 10 dogs will run off! I can safely shoot, stab, spear, poison, snare, strangle or dart it through the fence. You just lost your dog AND everything I steal! If it’s tied and I keep out of its reach, it’s useless. It’ll bark, but outside dogs bark so much they’re usually ignored. But let a dog hit the other side of a door or window I’m breaking into and I’m GONE! I can’t hurt it until it can hurt me, and nothing you own is worth my arm. Deterrence is effective protection.

Protection and aggression are not the same. Protection is defensive, reactive and often passive and threatens or injures no one. Aggression is active, harmful and offensive, threatens all and benefits none. Yard dogs often develop far more aggression than protectivity because everyone who passes by or enters has already violated the territory that dog has marked dozens of times a day for years. That’s not protection, it’s not desirable and it overlooks two facts of life today:

1) Property owners have implied social contracts with others in the community. Letter carriers, paper boys, delivery people, law enforcement, emergency medical personnel, meter readers and others are allowed near and at times on your property without your specific permission. Sure that ten-year-old was not supposed to jump your fence after his ball, kite or Frisbee; but neither you nor your dog are allowed to cause him injury if he does. Imagine this: A neighbor looks into your yard or window and sees you, your wife or your child laying on the floor in a pool of blood. They call 9-1-1 and your dog prevents paramedics from assisting! Should they shoot your dog or just let you die? Great choice.

2) Even if the intruder is a felon, few places allow you or your dog to cause physical injury to prevent property loss. Convicted felons have sued the dog’s owner from jail and won more in the suit than they could have stolen! Appalling but true. Don’t believe your homeowners insurance will cover the loss. Now you see why many feel that an “outside dog” is a no-brainer.

The more a dog is outdoors, the less behavioral control you have. It’s easier to solve four or five indoor problems than just one outdoors. The reason is simple: The more you control the stimuli that reach the dog, the more you control its responses. You’ve got a lot more control over your living room than you do over your county! When it’s bored but teased by every dog, cat, bird, squirrel, motorcycle, paperboy, airplane, firecracker, backfiring truck and rabbit in the county, OF COURSE it’ll dig, chew and bark. Would you sit still all day every day? Do you want unnecessary medical and parasite fees, especially as the dog ages?

When a dog is alone indoors you’re still 30% there because your scent and things it associates with you constantly remind it of you and your training. When it’s out, it’s alone whether you’re home or not. Do you expect it to keep YOU in mind while the entire world teases, distracts and stimulates it?

The media are full of stories about family dogs saving everyone during a fire. How many people, including children, would be dead today if those dogs were kept out? SURE you always get up to investigate every time your yard dog barks. And I’ve got this bridge…..

An outdoor dog has an address, not a home. Does your dog get so much mail that it needs its own address? The real value dogs offer is as companion animals. Do you live out in your yard? Whose company does your yard dog keep and protect? Stop behavior problems and start enjoying real protection and companionship.

Bring your dogs in.

Copyright 1993 Dennis Fetko, Ph.D. (858-485-7433, Fax 858-485-0651). The author authorizes this article to be copied, quoted or used however it will do the most good as long as proper credit is given.

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